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All posts by Catherine Parker

Catherine Parker
Catherine Parker is a social media and search consultant and web copywriter. Via her first love, copywriting, she fell into the search engine marketing industry, working at Quirk eMarketing in Cape Town, followed by Greenlight Marketing in London, and then iProspect in San Francisco. Most recently, she headed the in-house SEO team at online content network CBS Interactive (formerly CNET) in San Francisco. First exposed to social media as part of SEO strategy, she’s since recognised its value to businesses in its own right. Now based in Cape Town, Catherine runs Rank&Copy, which helps businesses grow their brand online through paid and organic search, social media campaigns, and sparkling web copy. Her book, “301 Ways to Use Social Media Now in Your Marketing”, is due out in September 2010.
  • An international perspective on SA startups [NetProphet]

    Angel investing came accidentally to UK-based Permjot Valia. As the sales and marketing director of Ernst & Young, he became involved in their entrepreneur programme, which in turn led to his new career of investing in startups. By his own admission, Valia’s success rate is a statistical anomaly: while an average of only 3% of investors successfully exit a startup via an IPO, the first company he invested in went public within just seven months. Visiting Cape Town this week to work with local entrepreneurs, Valia shared his experiences, garnered over the course of his 25 or so investments,...

  • Samasource CEO on bridging the digital divide and creating a global meritocracy

    While aid programs in developing countries are ubiquitous, precious few empower the people they’re trying to help on a sustainable, ongoing basis. One that bucks this trend is Samasource, a non-profit based in San Francisco that distributes digital work from large US multinationals in manageable chunks to poor but educated workers in developing countries such as Kenya, Uganda, India, Pakistan and Haiti. Samasource workers do basic digital work required by US companies that American workers wouldn’t necessarily be willing to do. For example, Google Maps has local business information that changes when a company moves, expands or shut down....