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All posts by Tech In Asia

Tech In Asia
Tech in Asia is an online technology news startup based in Asia, with team members all across the region. As a crew of journalists and bloggers with a passion for new ways of delivering the news, we’ve bonded together under one goal – to create a great Asia-focused tech news site to tell the world about the wonderful things that are happening here. Subscribe to our daily newsletter.
  • Two brothers are going the Rovio way with their gaming startup

    Indonesia’s video game industry is just waking up. Local game companies have been around since the late 90s, but most of them limited themselves to publishing international online games in Indonesia. Others were essentially outsourcing studios, taking on jobs from bigger foreign games studios without getting much credit for their work. About seven years ago, a shift occurred. Indonesian developers started creating their own intellectual property, mostly for Flash-based titles. The rise of Flash games made it easier for smaller studios to publish and distribute games. This new attitude of creating things locally was passed on to the next generation...

  • India’s Xiaomi backer bets on a startup that tracks other startups

    Ratan Tata remains a respected name in India, where several business tycoons are tarnished with the brush of crony capitalism. He retired at the end of 2012 after helming the Tata Group of companies which collectively had over US$100 billion in revenues. He’s credited with turning the Tatas from a family-run business to a professionally managed global entity after taking the reins in 1991, when India embarked on economic liberalization. The benefits of that experience and reputation have been flowing to startups over the past couple of years, as Ratan Tata has taken to investing in entrepreneurs since his retirement....

  • 11 big startup acquisitions in India and what they mean for entrepreneurs

    Observers of an emerging startup ecosystem look for exits as a sign of maturity. That is because exits in the form of mergers and acquisitions (M&As) or IPOs give VCs a return on their investment. They can then launch new funds to invest in fresh startups. It completes the cycle of venture capital. Indian tech IPOs are rare. So the approval given in September by the Securities and Exchange Board of India (SEBI) to ecommerce firm Infibeam to raise INR 4,500 million (US$68 million) breaks new ground. Rivals Flipkart and Snapdeal will be watching what kind of reception the public...

  • What you need to know about growing your marketplace

    If you’re a new startup, or contemplating starting out, odds are you are thinking of creating something as a “two-sided platform.” That is, a platform-based business where you connect service givers to customers -- think Practo or Redbus. Now, if you’re starting out, you’re probably thinking, but how do I overcome our daily challenges to get there? The question gets all the more relevant in India now, as 2016 is going to see some major cold feet from investors. That means no more easy money, and no more “if I’m a startup, someone will fund me” assurances. Only those with solid...

  • 6 startups scaling up in India

    Startups that operate in important sectors such as healthcare, analytics, and small business lending found funding today. And then there was news of an investment by industry honcho Ratan Tata. Here are the six on our list today: UrbanClap Local services marketplace UrbanClap has just found an investor in industrialist Ratan Tata, who has put in money in his personal capacity, the company said in a statement. UrbanClap is a marketplace for hiring professionals for local services such as plumbing, yoga training, tutoring and wedding photography. It provides over 80 services and operates in NCR, Bangalore, Mumbai, Chennai, Pune, and Hyderabad. The...

  • 5 startups to watch in China in 2016

    It sometimes feels like China’s tech scene is dominated by giant companies. Tencent, Baidu, Xiaomi and the like are behemoth, multi-billion dollar enterprises. It’s easy to forget that five years ago Xiaomi was secretly prepping to launch its first phone. In that spirit, we examined five companies that caught our eye in 2015 – and which might turn some heads in 2016. Dianrong: because China’s small-business lending sector was a complete mess Peer-to-peer lending services exploded in China in 2015 – and no company embodied this trend better than Dianrong. Launched in 2012, the Shanghai-based company focuses on personal and small...

  • 20 startups from Asia that failed in 2015 and lessons learned

    2015 was a hot year for some startups in Asia. Venture capital flowed into China, India and South Korea in previously unheard of amounts. Southeast Asia saw a record exit with iProperty Group’s US$534million acquisition. Yet raising gargantuan rounds of financing is no guarantee for future success, and it’s in the risky nature of entrepreneurship that some companies emerge as winners while others bite the dust. Here are 20 startups from Asia that were forced to shut down this year. We clustered them by country and in no particular order. These 20 are by no means the only ones to cease operations...

  • Here are 4 books every startup founder should read

    To be a successful entrepreneur, you need to be able to juggle several hats at the same time. Identifying a problem and developing a scalable solution is the easy bit. Your initial days as a founder may be spent coding and refining the technical architecture, but then comes a concerted effort on streamlining operations, drumming up sales, and executing a marketing strategy. In an ideal scenario, founders already have experience in what it takes to build a company. They might have worked different jobs in the past or have a fancy college degree which will, at the very least, point...

  • When do startups stop being startups?

    At Tech in Asia we often come across well-funded companies that have been in existence for a number of years, but began as a startup. Personally, I used to think the term “startup” simply referred to an immature technology business, or a small company starting out on their journey to success. But flying in the face of this logic are world-renowned entities like Xiaomi, Didi Kuaidi, and US companies Airbnb and Uber. They’ve all been referred to as startups, but at some point they clearly managed to graduate to fully-fledged giants. Surely there must be some way we can distinguish...

  • Uber starts testing first-ever cash payments in India

    Ride-hailing company Uber this week announced it will offer cash payments for Indian customers looking to hail a car, as part of a pilot program in Hyderabad. The move marks a global first for the company. Prior to the Hyderabad pilot, Uber has steadfastly avoided accepting cash for its car services. While riders could pay for trips using bank notes on UberAuto, the company’s India-only auto-rickshaw service, it ceased to accept cash for any of its car-oriented tiers -- both in Asia and elsewhere. Uber’s distaste for cash likely stems from two reasons. First, Uber can’t easily enforce percentage-based commissions on...