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All posts by Tech In Asia

Tech In Asia
Tech in Asia is an online technology news startup based in Asia, with team members all across the region. As a crew of journalists and bloggers with a passion for new ways of delivering the news, we’ve bonded together under one goal – to create a great Asia-focused tech news site to tell the world about the wonderful things that are happening here. Subscribe to our daily newsletter.
  • Why we rejected $100k in funding when we had next to nothing in the bank

    Earlier this year, my team was offered US$100 000 (or INR 6 million) in funding with a 1.5 CR convertible note for a one-year-old startup. We had to politely decline. Wait, what? You must think we are crazy for passing up on such an amazing opportunity when most entrepreneurs probably wouldn't. But hell yeah, we did! And you haven't even heard the worst part: after spending almost a year as a bootstrapping startup, we barely had enough money to survive the next month. This whole time, our primary goal was to test our hypothesis, improve our MVP, tweak the business model, figure...

  • ‘Fitbit for cows’ just got into Y Combinator

    Remember the 'Fitbit for cows', the wearable that helped farmers increase milk yields? Well, they just announced that they're part of Y Combinator's winter '17 batch. Cowlar, which started up in Pakistan but is now headquartered in California, builds a tracking wearable that monitors the body temperature and behavior of cows. That allows farmers to detect when the animal is in heat and the best time for insemination. It becomes the second startup from the country to be accepted into Y Combinator – after artisanal shoes startup Markhor did it in 2015. Umer Adnan, CEO of Cowlar, claims the wearable helps increase...

  • Meet the fast-growing Go-Jek of Bangladesh

    Dhaka, Bangladesh’s capital, is an insanely densely populated city. Growing up here, Elius Hussain says, one thing is always on your mind. The traffic. The horrible jams. How you have to sometimes wait for hours before you can even get on a bus to go home. You say Jakarta is bad. You’ve not been to Dhaka. Regardless of which city makes for the more catastrophic commute, it’s obvious that mobility is an issue in Bangladesh’s capital. How to beat the traffic Pathao, the startup Elius runs, transports goods and people on two wheels – to beat traffic. It’s basically the Go-Jek of Bangladesh, and...

  • Eduardo Saverin in $25m funding for insurance and wellness marketplace

    Rosaline Koo made a huge bet with CXA. Not long after she started up the healthcare products marketplace, it acquired Singapore’s third-largest homegrown insurance brokerage, Pan Group. Rosaline injected all her life savings and took out a loan to finance the purchase and build the venture. It’s now paying off. CXA today announced it has become a US$100 million company following a US$25 million series B investment, co-led by Facebook co-founder Eduardo Saverin’s B Capital Group and Singapore-based EDBI. Global life and health reinsurance company RGA, Philips Healthcare, maker of data-driven medical devices and disease management programs, and existing investors NSI...

  • Silicon Valley is no longer the biggest startup game say these investors

    Tech has stolen the market cap crown from the oil tycoons. This change is perfectly natural according to a panel of regional experts last month at Innovation Weekend in Tokyo, but the Silicon Valley kingdom is also teetering on being overthrown. "The day of America as the single IT leader is over," writes founding partner Takeshi Ebihara of Rebright Partners on his blog. Citing PricewaterhouseCoopers’ MoneyTree report, Takeshi emphasises that the amount of funding for startups in China grew eightfold in just two years to US$37 billion in 2015. That’s less than US$59 billion in the same period for the US....

  • I launched 5 startups in 2016. Here’s why, how, and what I learned

    This year I launched five startups from nowhere. Here, I’ll tell you how it happened; how I ended up venture building before I knew what a venture builder was, how I manage to get through two lawsuits in the space of six months, and how I raised US$7 million without telling investors what they were investing in. How I began Towards the end of 2014, the Malaysian property market was looking as dead as a dodo, (not good for my property development company), so I started looking for something to keep myself busy. My last tech venture had been back in 2010...

  • Meet the entrepreneur who just snared $350m to slaughter Uber

    "The idea was not just to build a big business, but start one that would have a big impact," explains Mudassir Sheikha, co-founder of ride-hailing startup Careem. "We wanted to improve the lives of thousands of people and change society for the better." And it seems like Mudassir’s on track to succeed on both fronts. Careem’s now the newest ride-hailing unicorn – it announced today that it’s pocketed a substantial US$350 million from a slew of investors including Rakuten and Saudi Telecom. The funding round is the single largest investment in any startup from Dubai. And there still might be more...

  • Jungle Ventures raises $100m fund for Southeast Asia and beyond

    Singapore-based venture capital firm Jungle Ventures announced today it has completed fundraising for its second fund, achieving its target of US$100 million. That’s ten times larger than Jungle’s previous US$10 million fund, which closed in 2012. It had raised around US$65 million in September 2015. Jungle Ventures founding partner Amit Anand tells Tech in Asia part of the new fund has already been deployed, in investments like Thailand’s Pomelo, Singapore’s Tradegecko, and Indonesia’s FinAccel. The VC doesn’t reveal the total amount that has been invested from the new fund so far. New investors include Temasek Holdings, Singapore’s National Research Foundation, and European media...

  • This startup wants to be the Google for your personal data

    Picture this: It’s an awfully busy day. In midst of all the chaos an email lands in your inbox, from your boss demanding certain documents urgently. What do you do? Spend next 30 minutes frantically searching for the documents across your multiple accounts. No luck. Panic sets in. What if there was an easier way to do the same task in less than 5 minutes? That’s VaultEdge. This new startup is aiming to be the Google for your personal data. VaultEdge is a vault that will automatically organize all your documents from multiple accounts into categories like taxes, bill, and so on....

  • 6 lessons startups can learn from the corporate world

    Many books and articles have been written on what corporates can learn from startups — how to build an agile culture, foster creativity in the team, and ship products quickly. However, the opposite is also true in many cases. There are areas that a startup can learn from a well run corporate. Implementing these lessons early on will help a startup immensely along its journey to be a large well-managed company. When I moved from a corporate life to the world of startups, what took me by surprise was the similarities between the two regardless of some fundamental differences. In the...